Thought Leaders

  • Millennials

    Fast 5: Q & A with Chaloner Associates President, Amy Segelin: 5 Things to Know About Recruiting Millennials

    In Career, Thought Leaders on

    By Brooks Wallace

    Working in the communications, PR and marketing recruiting world for more than 15 years puts Chaloner Associates President, Amy Segelin (@amysegelin), in a unique position to observe generational differences among talent groups. The generation on everyone’s mind these days is millennials – trying to find them, retain them and figure out what makes them tick. But what it boils down to, says Segelin, is how each group was raised and what technology each had at its disposal. Millennials are very level-headed, smart and tech-savvy. It’s no secret that millennials have grown up with more access to technology than any generation before them, and that tech savviness has shaped their tastes, priorities and intelligence.

    We caught up with Amy to ask her 5 things to know about recruiting millennials.

    1. First, company reputation is incredibly important to millennials. Again, this comes back to technology, because millennials can find ANYTHING online. One bad online review from a disgruntled employee can ruin the reputation a company has worked so hard to build. Employers have to be ready to answer tough questions.
    2. Culture culture culture. Take a look at millennial focused job markets — San Francisco, Austin, Portland, Brooklyn. They want food sharing, common gathering areas, a high level of in-person interaction, a coffee culture, rooftop gatherings, etc. There’s been a total shift in culture. They’re all about creating a community within the work culture.
    3. Millennials are a generation that understands you don’t have to burn the midnight oil to excel at your job. Time for extracurricular interests outside of work are important to them. They don’t believe they have to eat, breathe and sleep work. This is a nouveau work/life balance.
    4. It’s very important for millennials to feel a sense of giving back through their work. The mission of the organization is important to them; they prefer to feel they’re tied to a mission. This is something we talk about with millennial candidates all the time.
    5. They know their market value, so make sure you have a clear and honest conversation about compensation from the get-go. Don’t be surprised when they come back wanting more. Specific to PR, millennials who work in PR know how in-demand they are, especially the AAE, AE, AS level. We see them get counter-offers or entertain competing offers and take time to make their decision.

    Amy joined Chaloner in 2001 as the company’s first-ever project manager, and was quickly promoted to recruiter. In 2004, she relocated to New York and established the company’s second location. Today, as president and owner, she oversees both offices, builds business and works on national searches in all industries. Amy graduated from St. Lawrence University, and before joining Chaloner, she worked for global retailer, Talbots. Actively involved with several charities, she often speaks at communications and recruitment industry events. Amy lives in Brooklyn with her husband and young children. Amy also helped establish PRSA Boston’s Ted Chaloner Learning Fund, which helps early and mid-level career chapter members access best practices learning opportunities in social impact communications and public relations.

     

    About Fast 5

    This is a feature of PRSA Boston’s Hot Topics blog page. The expert subject is someone who is clearly in demand, on the go, and nailing them down for a conversation is about as easy as … winning Powerball at $1.5 billion! But we know leaders like to share, so check back for insights, wisdom, author’s books about to hit the stands and other valuable tips. @prsaboston #prsabos

    Do YOU have a candidate for a FAST 5 interview? Email: Joshua Milne at josh@joshuamilnepr.com and pitch your subject expert!

    Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author or the individual being interviewed and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of PRSA Boston, PRSA National, staff or  board of directors of either organization. 

  • Mark McClennan, APR

    FAST 5: Q&A with PRSA Chair Mark McClennan, APR

    Public relations must do more than simply ‘occupy’ a seat at the C-suite table says longtime chapter member and past-president Mark McClennan, APR.

    Mark (@McClennan), who is senior vice president, social media services for MSLGroup in Waltham, recently began his term as Chair of the PRSA national Board of Directors, having been elected by chapter delegates of the 22,000 member organization. Among his priorities are ensuring that PR professionals have the resources and professional development to remain trusted advisers to the C-suite so they can hold their spot at leadership’s table.

    His term year has arrived with a bang: a recent New York State Joint Commission on Public Ethics (JCOPE) advisory opinion that will expand the definition of ‘lobbyist’ and implications that public relations practitioners would incur new regulatory compliance as a result. He is quoted in a recent PRSA release on this issue HERE.

    We caught up with Mark for a FAST 5 to ask him to reflect on the importance of PR, his priorities for PRSA in 2016, and the increasingly important role Boston is playing in the PR universe, with a visit by PRSA CEO Joe Truncale later this month and hosting the PRSA Northeast District Conference (PRXNE16, @prsane #prxne) in June.

    #1 – Where is PR today?

    PR is more important today than it has ever been. When I first joined the mantra was, “PR needs a seat at the table.” Today, for the most part we have a seat at the table. But having a seat at the table isn’t enough. We all know the dinner guest who just eats the food and is not invited back. Today the challenge is consistently reinforcing PR as a lead discipline and trusted counselor at the table. If we are not advancing sage counsel in every interaction, we are hurting ourselves, and we have enough detractors that we can’t afford to do that.

    #2 – Why PRSA?

    This is the question I get the most from non-members, and I love it. PRSA is the best and deepest resource for you to engage with to advance yourself as a professional and to help advance your career. We have 22,000 members in more than 110 chapters, and another 11,000 students and great intern candidates across 334 student chapters. This is the recruitment pipeline of our future. Within our membership we have 14 dedicated professional-interest sections that instantly connect you to professionals who are facing the same challenges you are.

    But when people ask me about the cost, I have a simple answer. The true cost of PRSA is two to four hours a month. If you are willing to invest that by getting involved and not just coming to meetings, the rewards will blow away any dues amount. And if you are not willing to invest that much time in your career, then others who are will pass you by.

    I credit PRSA with playing a huge role in advancing my career. Ann Getman taught me so much about PR research that she made a hard-charging AE seem really smart to his managers in the 1990s. Kirk Hazlett has been a mentor and friend for almost 20 years. But that is just the beginning. The more you get involved the better it gets. I have had the pleasure of being active on the local, district, section and national level. Every time I volunteer, I find the opportunities and awards more than I ever expected.

    #3 – What PRSA events are you looking forward to the most in 2016?

    The great thing about PRSA is there are so many outstanding events – and there is always one for your specific need. Locally, the PRSA Northeast District Conference (PRXNE16) in June is shaping up to be a dynamite event. We have Joe Truncale, CEO of PRSA (and a closet Red Sox fan), who visited us last week for our March Board Meeting and March Madness Mixer then attended our 3rd annual APR St. Patrick’s Day Breakfast the next day. He’s also going to be speaking at PRXNE16.

    The International Conference in Indianapolis in October is going to be outstanding. If you have never been, this is the year to go. Three days of information-packed professional development and more than 1,500 PR pros. Finally, I love the PRSA Counselors Academy Spring Conference in May. It is a multi-day session designed for senior agency executives and agency owners.

    #4 – What are some of your key priorities during your 2016 tenure as National Chair?

    My top priority is serving our members and working to increase the value that PRSA provides to them that is actionable in their daily career lives. That includes a number of initiatives, including growing the section communities (PRSA’s professional interest groups), working to improve the way we leverage technology to deliver programming and information, supporting the opportunities and development of new professionals, executing campaigns that have a positive impact on diversity and seeing where we can improve our governance model.

    Like any good PR pro, I realize that while I have my plans, outside circumstances may cause some re-calibration, as the New York State Joint Commission on Public Ethics (JCOPE) did with its recent ruling. This could have a significant impact on many of our members and needs to be addressed.

    #5 – What is your PR pet peeve?

    Too often PR people are cutting themselves off at the knees when they are advising the C-suite by saying, “I went into PR because I hate math.”

    I think it’s more accurate that PR professionals want to make our society a better place. We arrive understanding that language and communications can advance a myriad of experiences that make our lives better, simply because we foster understanding, acceptance and consideration of innovative ideas and new perspectives. I can have a 20-minute debate with almost any PR person about the pros and cons of the Oxford comma or “over” vs. “more than.” But too many forget the language of business is numbers. If the C-suite hears you saying “I hate math,” it undermines your ability to act as a trusted, strategic adviser. This is a self-inflicted wound, and PR people need to stop saying it.

    About Mark McClennan

    Mark McClennan, APR, (@McClennan) is Chair of the PRSA National Board of Directors, the leading membership governance authority for the Association. Mark is senior vice president, social media services for MSLGROUP, based in Waltham, Mass. In his more than 18 years at MSLGROUP, Mark has led teams in a variety of industries, including consumer technology, financial services and gaming. He regularly advises clients on social media strategies and crisis management. His teams have been recognized with more than 45 awards for excellence in public relations, including five Silver Anvils. Mark has a B.A. in public relations and political science from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. He is past chair of the Northeast District of PRSA and a former president of PRSA Boston.

    About FAST 5

    This is an interview feature of PRSA Boston’s Hot Topics blog page. The expert subject is someone who is clearly in demand, on the go, and nailing them down for a conversation is about as easy as … winning Powerball at $1.5 billion! But we know leaders like to share, so check back for insights, wisdom, author’s books about to hit the stands and other valuable tips. @prsaboston #prsabos

    Do YOU have a candidate for a FAST 5 interview? Email: Joshua Milne at josh@joshuamilnepr.com and pitch your subject expert!

    Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author or the individual being interviewed and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of PRSA Boston, PRSA National, staff or  board of directors of either organization. 

  • Katie Paine

    FAST 5: Q&A with Metrics ‘Queen’ Katie Delahaye Paine

    FAST 5 is PRSA Boston’s ‘on the fly’ Q&A with a trailblazer, influencer or newsmaker. 

    Meet Katie Delahaye Paine: PR Measurement Guru, Researcher, Author, and Lecturer.
    Katie is the speaker in the chair of our January 26th fireside chat program that PRSA Boston is co-hosting with the Publicity Club of NE. The subject: PR measurement, a must-know for any PR practitioner. From KPIs to analytics tools to using metrics to benchmark PR performance, Katie’s been leading the way for going on 30 years. Katie will be interviewed by Christine Perkett (@missusP), known as founder of PerkettPR and now with the added CEO title from SeeDepth, Inc., her fledgling PR measurement analytics firm. We caught up with Katie in between speaking trips at her New Hampshire office and pitchd this busy PRSA Yankee Chapter member our FAST 5: 

    #1 – Do you follow any PR blogs? If so, which ones?

    Yes! There are so many out there with great insights, but there are only so many hours in the day available to read them. My favorites include Josh Bernoff’s (@jbernoff) Without Bullshit and past PRSA presenter Christopher Penn’s (@cspenn) Almost Timely. I also like reading Bob Garfield (@Bobosphere) and Shel Israel (@shelisrael).

    #2 – What is the most important PR book you own (other than yours)?

    Can’t Buy Me Like by Bob Garfield, or more recently Lethal Generosity by Shel Israel.

    #3 – Tell us about an important trend that you think will impact the PR world this year.

    I think we are going to see a trend of the integration of internal and external communications. If your own people are unable to serve as brand ambassadors, you will have a much more difficult time achieving PR success.

    #4 – What are the two or three essential apps or software that any PR person should have?

    You really can’t live without Excel (specifically Pivot Tables). Google Analytics is also essential.

    #5 – Where is the one place in the world that you absolutely want to visit in your lifetime?

    I really want to cruise the Cuban coast. There are some really interesting changes happening in Cuba, and I’m excited about having the chance to be able to see some of that beautiful country.

    Katie predicts 2016 will be a tumultuous year of change in how we measure PR. Read more HERE.

    About Katie Delahaye Paine

    Also known as ‘The Measurement Queen,’ Katie has been a pioneer in the field of measurement for more than two decades. She has founded two measurement companies, KDPaine & Partners Inc. and The Delahaye Group.  Her books, Measure What Matters (Wiley, March 2011) and Measuring Public Relationships (KDPaine & Partners, 2007) are considered must-reads for anyone tasked with measuring public relations and social media. Her latest book, written with Beth Kanter (@kanter), Measuring the Networked Nonprofit: Using Data to Change the Worldis the 2013 winner of the Terry McAdam Book Award. Follow Katie @queenofmetrics and on Facebook. She invites email: measurementqueen@gmail.com

    About FAST 5

    This is a new feature of PRSA Boston’s Hot Topics blog page. The expert subject is someone who is clearly in demand, on the go, and nailing them down for a conversation is about as easy as… winning Powerball at $1.5 billion! But we know leaders like to share, so check back for insights, wisdom, author’s books about to hit the stands and other valuable tips. @prsaboston #prsabos

    Do YOU have a candidate for a FAST 5 interview? Email: Joshua Milne at josh@joshuamilnepr.com and pitch your subject expert!

    Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author or the individual being interviewed and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of PRSA Boston, PRSA National, staff or  board of directors of either organization. 

  • PRSA Boston Member Building Business Ties to Vietnam

    In APR, PRSA Member Feed, Thought Leaders on

    Longtime PRSA Boston colleague Dick Pirozzolo, APR is packing for a trip to Vietnam as part of a Boston Global Forum delegation headed by former Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis and Tuan Nguyen, founders of this Boston-based think tank.

    As part of the program Dick will be meeting with 100 of Vietnam’s top CEOs from just about every sector of the economy. He will also be meeting with commercial real estate industry leaders who are focused on developing resort properties on the South China Sea. If there is anything Dick can do for your organization by way of research or developing relationships for you in Vietnam, please let him know at dick@pirozzolo.com 

    By way of background, Dick has been active in Vietnam for some 20 years, having played a prominent role in US reconciliation and trade with this nation during the mid-1990s. He was invited this summer to take part in events marking the 20th anniversary of diplomatic relations and ties with this nation of 70 million.

    In Dick’s words: “Our relationship with Vietnam has evolved from former enemy to active trading partner and adventure travel destination to principal ally in maintaining the balance of power in the Pacific.”

    In the same vein as the White House’s announcement yesterday that U.S. has officially reopened trade relations with Cuba after 54 years (New York Times.com), stronger U.S. ties to Vietnam represents another generational shift in global relations and we look forward to some interesting stories when he returns!

  • Case Study: Developing an Effective and Successful Internal Communications Program 


    By Paul Kidwell, PRSA Boston member

    Shant Salakian Pic

    Shant Salakian

    Often a company’s internal communications strategy is defined by its structure and culture. After Takeda Pharmaceutical Company acquired Millennium Pharmaceuticals, a cultural icon within the Cambridge biotech sector, in 2008, it was critical to generate and support an ongoing dialogue between management and employees to both assess and articulate changes to the organization.

    More than ever, communications needed to be seen as a “two-way street” and that an employee’s voice was both strong and being heard by senior management. The company’s internal communications (IC) program was constant, consistent and a multi-media program of internal portal articles, videos on company televisions and a series of internal education and social events. PRSA Boston sat down with Shant Salakian, senior manager of IC at Takeda, to discuss his approach to developing an effective and successful IC program.

    PRSA Boston: What is the business rationale or goal that a company wants to achieve by implementing a proactive IC program?

    Shant Salakian: I believe the IC function is hugely responsible for engaging employees with the company mission and vision so that they come to work every day to give their best.

    PRSA Boston: IC programs must be more sophisticated than past endeavors to resonate with employees. Please cite some initiatives that have been the most successful.

    Shant Salakian: IC programs don’t necessarily need to be sophisticated. However, IC professionals need to work hard to make it easy for employees to participate in programs and understand company goals and values. Consistent, transparent and simple communications are, in my opinion, essential to empower employees to become brand ambassadors. Also, to truly resonate with employees, it’s important to seek their feedback through surveys, which allow you to tweak things the next time around!

    One of our IC programs that is incredibly successful yet simple in concept, connects our scientists and support staff with patients who are taking medicines discovered and developed by our company. The events feature patients who share their stories through testimonial videos and live interactions. Tapping into the core of why our employees are at work is incredibly inspiring.

    PRSA Boston: Do the internal messages differ from those that are being created for public audiences?

    Shant Salakian: I believe a successful IC program needs to closely mirror the same messages that are being communicated to external audiences. If this is done correctly, employees can be strong advocates for the brand and will naturally promote the company’s values and products with family and friends.

    PRSA Boston: By its nature, social media is designed to build and foster communities. Does social media have a role in helping to engage employees? What is its influence?

    Shant Salakian: Internal social media vehicles can be great tools to foster employee camaraderie and solicit quick feedback. However, guidelines need to be put in place so that these forums don’t become venting grounds. A moderator can help facilitate these forums and address any posts that don’t comply with guidelines. Also disallowing anonymous posting will alleviate a lot of the concerns senior management may have with these forums.

    PRSA Boston: Does IC integrate within the overall communications infrastructures such as PR, visual communications, etc.?

    Shant Salakian: IC is only one piece of the communication pie and should work hand in hand with other members of the corporate communications team. Close partnership between the functions allows a holistic and timely approach to communications.

    Post Author

    Paul Kidwell

    About the Author: Paul Kidwell is principal of Kidwell PR. He has 17 years of public relations experience in the biopharmaceutical sector. He can be reached at paulkidwell@comcast.net.