Posts tagged with ‘Fast Five’

  • Fast Five: Industry Disrupter & Results Program Moderator Adam Ritchie

    In Fast Five on

    Adam Ritchie is moderating our Oct. 30 panel called Communications Results: Data CMOs Want. This topic arose from a recent conversation thread on LinkedIn that hit a nerve and generated its own dialog, revealing a debate with questions about what CMOs and CCOs find valuable in PR results data. There is a lot to be said about how to distinguish PR data that ties to a true business impact vs data that is not much more than conflated data points intended to justify work and budgets. Ahead of this exciting program, Ritchie provided some excellent insight.

    Q1: Could you share a time you noticed the consequences of inaccurate PR results reporting?

    When a new client said a previous agency earned at least 100 pieces of coverage within a day of every press release, we knew they were referencing what PRWeb calls “pickup,” what Business Wire calls, “syndication” and what PRNewswire calls “distribution.” These are content partnerships between news wires and news sites, where press releases are published verbatim on backdoor areas of the sites, invisible to any browsing consumer and should never be passed off as real results. It confuses clients, leads them to believe coverage happens at the push of a button and makes what we do appear commoditized.

    Q2:  How can PR professionals improve their results reporting?

    Most clients know when they’re being served fluff, and unfortunately some of them have come to expect a certain degree of it from their agency partners. PR professionals have to resist taking the easy road offered by their own vendors, and not pass unbelievable metrics along to their clients. Clients need to hold agencies accountable for metrics that look too good to be true. Focus on quality. Quality of concept, outlet, message, visual and tone, tracking to agreed-on organizational priorities  – and ultimately quality of outcomes.

    Q3: How far into an organization should PR reporting go?

    A mentor once said, “Merchandise up until you get your hand slapped.” If you’re reporting something big, take it all the way to the top of the organization. PR can’t afford to get bottlenecked internally. CEOs and colleagues need to know why a powerful result happened and which part of the strategy brought it about. Don’t save it for regular check-ins; insightful, immediate, shareable reporting is some of the best reporting you can do.

    Q4: What is the biggest measurement challenge in PR today?

    In consumer product PR, the biggest measurement challenge is Amazon’s influence on lifestyle media. Most major news outlets are now part of Amazon’s affiliate network, and receive a portion of sales when a reader clicks through their coverage and buys an Amazon product. Editors are insisting on only using an Amazon link when they cover a brand, rather than backlinking to a client’s website. Amazon hoards all of this inbound conversion data, creating a blind spot in PR’s ability to prove its effectiveness. At a time when quantifiable results are top-of-mind, PR’s direct impact on sales is getting cut out of the picture.

    Q5: How do you feel about the industry’s renewed emphasis on measurement?

    The obsession with data and metrics, paired with the urge to quantify everything, is not good for brands. The numbers are being prioritized above the spirit of the work. Some people call it paralysis by analysis; I call it the fetishization of measurement. The best campaigns – the things that people in companies look back on as their proudest moments and the boldest, most adventurous moves they made – the things that earn respect for the PR profession – most of them would never have happened if someone got too hung up on measurement at the outset. You can’t afford to be anti-measurement, but measurement needs to take a back seat to concept if you want to do something great.

    Adam Ritchie is an industry disrupter in the best sense of the word, redefining the impact of being an independent practitioner handling top-tier brands. This past year he has set a 50-university philanthropic speaking goal to drive a conversation about how the PR profession can and should reinvent itself. He recently discussed with PRWeek this very topic of producing results data that is ethical, accurate and strengthens PR’s reputation. Adam’s agency has been recognized with many coveted industry awards in recent years. He is a graduate of the Newhouse School at Syracuse University.

     

  • Fast Five with Peter Brown, Principal, Peter Brown Communications

    In Fast Five, IPN on

    On February 28, IPN member Joshua Milne and Peter Brown will speak before the Independent Practitioners Network at the Wellesley Free Library about media and PR around the Boston Marathon.  Click on this link for more details and to register to attend the event.

    Peter’s relationship with the Boston Marathon dates back to 1983 when he first produced the race for WBZ-TV and then did so for more than 20 years. When he left Channel 4 in 2004, the Boston Athletic Association asked Peter to volunteer in two ways:  first as the BAA media liaison riding in one of the vehicles that precedes the elite athletes on the course and the other as a Governor of the BAA’s Board of Directors.

    Peter says some of his best TV memories are producing those live events.  After WBZ, Peter went on to become Vice President of Public Affairs at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.  His boss at the Brigham became CEO of Partners Healthcare and asked Peter to join him as his Chief of Staff.  In this role, Peter worked directly with the CEO and senior leadership to support the mission of Partners and its hospitals and oversee external affairs.  In May of 2015, Peter left Partners to open his own communications consulting business, Peter Brown Communications.

    The IPN Network recently sat down with Peter to chat with him about this career.

    Q: What sort of things do you do at the Marathon?

    A: When I left Channel 4 in 2004, Jack Fleming, now COO of the BAA said, “You’ve know this race.  We need someone to be on the lead media vehicle.”   How do you say no to that?  My role on the truck is to make sure the still photogs are in a position to get the pictures they need and to serve as a backup to the systems that are in place to track the runners.  Sitting in the truck in front of the elite athletes, I always say I have the best seat in the house on Marathon day. The race is evolving right in front of us.

    Q: Why did you make switch from TV to public affairs?

    A: It was a great opportunity to join BWH. I always believed the heart of journalism is good storytelling. Brigham brought a depth and breadth of extraordinary human-interest stories involving doctors, nurses, patients and staff members — a treasure trove of compelling stories to share with the media. I kept my foot in the media room by offering them good stories.

    Q: How did you make the transition to chief of staff at Partners happen?

    A: My boss at the Brigham is an inspiring leader, Dr. Gary Gottlieb.  Gary and I worked together for close to 12 years.  He left partners in March 2015. Our deal was, when he goes, I go.  I stayed on to help with the CEO transition but always wanted to start my own communications business.

    Q: When did you go out on own, and how’s it been?

    A: I launched my firm on May 3, 2015 – my birthday, a date I would remember.  My only challenge is with my “boss,” who makes me work weekends and nights!  Actually, it’s been a delight. When I was at Channel 4, I supervised more than 100 people.  Now as your own boss, you set your own schedule. You are the architect of your fate.

    I’m a communications consultant, not a PR person per se.  I work with people and organizations to create and develop their stories and work with them on how best to tell their stories to their audiences, both external and internal.  I also do crisis communications, media training and public speaking coaching.  Overall, it’s been a lot of fun and another great learning experience in life.

    About Fast 5

    This is a feature of PRSA Boston’s Hot Topics blog page. The expert subject is someone who is clearly in demand, on the go, and nailing them down for a conversation is about as easy as … winning Powerball at $1.5 billion! But we know leaders like to share, so check back for insights, wisdom, author’s books about to hit the stands and other valuable tips. @prsaboston #prsabos

    Do YOU have a candidate for a FAST 5 interview? Email: Joshua Milne at josh@joshuamilnepr.com and pitch your subject expert!

    Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author or the individual being interviewed and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of PRSA Boston, PRSA National, staff or  board of directors of either organization. 

  • Fast Five: Tara Goodwin Frier, founder and CEO, The Goodwin Group PR  

    In Chapter Events, Fast Five on

     

    PRSA Boston recently spoke with Tara Goodwin Frier, entrepreneur and founder of Goodwin Group PR, to learn more about her thoughts on today’s PR job market, the most important skills that agency or companies look for in prospective employees and common mistakes that job seekers regularly make.

    Goodwin Frier is schedule to participate on a panel called “New Year, New Career” that will be held on Monday, January 29th. The panel is designed for any PR professional who wants to grow his or her career or take on new and exciting challenges in 2018. The event will offer an all-star panel including Goodwin Frier, Norine Shults, VP at Chaloner, and a special guest from MullenLowe.

    Here is a Q&A from our conversation with Goodwin Frier.

    Q: What prompted you to launch Goodwin, and what do you like about it?

    A: It was accidental, and I owe the launch of Goodwin Group PR to Edelman CEO Richard Edelman. At the time, I was working as VP of Public Affairs, and after 9/11, the technology bubble burst sending us into a recession. Richard made the decision to close five of the smaller Edelman offices, Boston among them. I had the unenviable task of laying off all the Boston employees as our GM was conveniently out of the country when the news broke and I was second in command. Richard said he was not going to come back to Boston and that if I wanted to take the clients I worked with and start my own consultancy, he was fine with it. At the time I was pregnant with my youngest son, Will, who is now 15. I thought “why not?” so I did and couldn’t be happier that I took the risk. I love seeing our clients grow their companies as a result of our work—one client doubled his revenues from $3-6 million annually because of an offbeat idea we came up with at a meeting!

    Q: What should PR people know about today’s job market?

    A: As a CEO, I’m constantly seeking new talent, and it is highly competitive fighting for the limited positions that are available. Two of the people who have become permanent, trusted employees came to me as volunteers because they were so eager to learn the business and hone their skills. This gave me the opportunity to see them in action and both ended up making themselves indispensable to our team, and we had to hire them. I would advise PR job seekers to look for opportunities at a firm you love even if they don’t have any openings at the moment. You can make an impression either by being an intern, offering helpful suggestions, volunteering on a project or event or generally keeping in touch with suggestions or commenting on a recent article, etc. Our motto is “whatever it takes” and we expect job seekers to be willing to do whatever is needed for the team and our clients.

    Q:  What are the most common mistakes – and winning moves – job seekers make?

    A: Winning moves—DO YOUR HOMEWORK. If you don’t know a lot about our company, we’re not convinced you want to be part of our team. ASK QUESTIONS—the worst thing you can do is show up for an interview and when we ask if you have questions, answer with a “nope.”  RELATE YOUR EXPERIENCE/TALENTS TO OUR WORK—how does what you have done fit with the work you know we do? WRITE A HANDWRITTEN THANK-YOU NOTE—we love old school attention to detail!

    Worst things you can do—SHOW UP LATE TO AN INTERVIEW—on-time is late for us. SEND US A RESUME OR WRITING SAMPLE WITH TYPOS—even one! BE A SUPERFAN—we work with several New England Patriots, and we can’t have people who are enamored with a player or coach. One prospective intern wrote on her Facebook page that she wanted to sleep with Gronk—Um….no thanks!

    Q: What are the top three skills in demand by your clients and account teams?

    A: Media relations, video production and blog/content writing.

    Q: What’s changed the most since you began your career?

    A: Having so many places to pitch and promote content as a result of the internet’s growth and the development multiple social mediums to get your news out there—it can get overwhelming and often, it’s hard to teach an old dog new tricks. My staff congratulates me if I correctly post/tag client news on our social channels!

    Also, from a crisis perspective, I used to say “The first few hours of managing a crisis will determine the success or failure of your efforts.” Now, with citizen journalists and the immediacy of social media, it’s SECONDS not hours and people need to be better prepared to respond.

    Goodwin Frier brings more than 30 years of media relations, public affairs and public policy experience to her firm. since founding Goodwin PR in 2001, Goodwin Frier has built a company that attracts, engages and sustains clients ranging from small startups and nonprofit organizations to high-profile CEOs, professional athletes and coaches. She is considered an expert in crisis communications, media relations, strategic events and effective content development and curation.  Known for her open and honest counsel, Goodwin Frier helps clients develop communications programs that drive traffic, develop relationships and resonate with key audiences.  She is a driven and focused leader who partners with her clients to deliver exceptional results.

    About Fast 5

    This is a feature of PRSA Boston’s Hot Topics blog page. The expert subject is someone who is clearly in demand, on the go, and nailing them down for a conversation is about as easy as … winning Powerball at $1.5 billion! But we know leaders like to share, so check back for insights, wisdom, author’s books about to hit the stands and other valuable tips. @prsaboston #prsabos

     

    Do YOU have a candidate for a FAST 5 interview? Email: Joshua Milne at josh@joshuamilnepr.com and pitch your subject expert!

    Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author or the individual being interviewed and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of PRSA Boston, PRSA National, staff or  board of directors of either organization. 
  • Fast Five Q&A: Norine Shults, vice president, Chaloner

    In Fast Five on

    On Monday, January 29th, PRSA Boston is hosting a panel discussion called “New Year, New Career”. The panel is designed for any PR professionals who wants a grow his or her career or take on new and exciting challenges in 2018. The event will offer an all-star panel of talent recruiters including Norine Shults, VP at Chaloner, Tara Goodwin Frier, Founder & CEO of Goodwin Group PR and a special guest from MullenLowe.

    Shults joined Chaloner in January 2017. Prior to joining the firm, she spent her career in communications and PR, both on the agency side and corporate side with 10 years at Fidelity Investments. We recently spoke with Shults on why she joined Chaloner, how she works with job seekers and what are the top skills that companies want from employees.

    Q: What landed you at Chaloner, and what do you like about it?

    A: When I was looking for a new job after leaving Fidelity, I signed up for the Chaloner monthly e-newsletter which lists job postings. I’ve known Chaloner for years — since back in the day in NYC — and had always had great respect for the firm. In the October 2016 newsletter I saw a posting for a “VP of Chaloner,” which intrigued me. After reading the job description, I was even more interested. While I thought to myself I’ve never been a recruiter per se, I had been a hiring manager (agency and client side) for 25 years and clearly understand the communications discipline and what it takes to succeed. So, I thought this could be a really neat turn in my career and submitted my resume and cover letter. After four interviews, I was even more convinced this would be a great move and I was thrilled when Amy Segelin made me the job offer last January. What I love about the job is that it allows me to use my communications experience and skills in helping companies and candidates come together for their mutual benefit. I feel such an incredible sense of satisfaction when my client is happy and ready to make an offer, and the candidate, who I am 99 percent confident will be a great asset to the organization, accepts it. In essence, I thoroughly enjoy being a matchmaker!

    Q: How does an executive recruiting firm like Chaloner work with job seekers?

    A: We meet and talk on the phone with job seekers on a daily basis. People approach us for informational purposes or to apply for and/or discuss one of our job postings. It is our longstanding practice to always follow up and have a conversation even if we don’t have a current search that is a match, we want to learn about them, make sure they are in our database and keep in touch for future opportunities. We also proactively reach out to prospective candidates who we believe look like a good fit for a particular search we have underway. The tools we use include our 100,000+ candidate database, LinkedIn and our own professional networks. We are extremely thoughtful and deliberate working with candidates to ensure that the job opportunity is right for them, and that the candidates are right for the clients. This means that we have regular and thorough conversations/meetings. We can’t be 100 percent sure, of course, but we probe and vet to the best of our ability. Chaloner’s and our own personal reputations are on the line. Again, our goal is to ensure a long-term, mutually rewarding relationship between the client and candidate. We want to see that it’s a win-win.

    Q: What are the top three skills in demand by your clients?

    A: Excellent writing and editing skills. It seems like a no-brainer but they are a universal must. Be prepared to provide samples and/or take a writing test, even at more senior levels. 2.) Collaboration/teamwork; no lone wolfs need apply, and leave your ego at the door. Every team player is expected to pitch in and do whatever it takes to get the job done, no matter how “lowly” the task. 3.) Outstanding client service skills and the ability to influence and earn the respect and trust of senior executives. Our clients are looking for professionals who have the gravitas to stand toe-to-toe with executives, albeit in a respectful way.

    Q: What’s your guilty pleasure?

    A: I hate to admit this, but I love watching the “Housewives” shows on Bravo. It drives my husband nuts, but I think they are hilarious and make for a nice escape from the seriousness of the real world.

    Q: What’s changed the most since you began your career?

    A: Everything! Seriously, technology. When I started in 1984, we were still using typewriters and then moved up to DEC machines and floppy disks. It was all old school:  mailing press kits, faxing press releases, pitching the media by phone or taking an editor or reporter to lunch or dinner, cutting out press coverage or getting clippings from Bacon’s. There was no email or social media or BlackBerries or cell phones. And the measurement of results was in its infancy; the sophistication we have now is extraordinary.

     

    About Fast 5

    This is a feature of PRSA Boston’s Hot Topics blog page. The expert subject is someone who is clearly in demand, on the go, and nailing them down for a conversation is about as easy as … winning Powerball at $1.5 billion! But we know leaders like to share, so check back for insights, wisdom, author’s books about to hit the stands and other valuable tips. @prsaboston #prsabos

    Do YOU have a candidate for a FAST 5 interview? Email: Joshua Milne at josh@joshuamilnepr.com and pitch your subject expert!

    Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author or the individual being interviewed and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of PRSA Boston, PRSA National, staff or  board of directors of either organization. 

     

  • Fast Five Q&A: Jill Goddard, APR, Director of Public Relations and Social Media at Boston Ballet

    Jill Goddard serves as the Director of Public Relations and Social Media at Boston Ballet. With over ten years of experience in public relations, communications and non-profit development, her work has centered on mission-based organizations primarily in the non-profit sector including Covenant House International, Oxfam America, and the Unitarian Universalist Association. She holds a M.A. in Global Marketing Communications and Advertising from Emerson College and a B.A. in Political Science and Journalism from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

    PRSA Boston recently sat down with Jill to learn more about her career and why she decided to join the Boston Ballet.

    Q: How did you get involved with Boston Ballet?

    A: I have always been a fan and admirer of the talent and artistry of Boston Ballet and an arts enthusiast in general. My former colleague and friend, who serves as the director of individual giving for Boston Ballet, told me about the open position and asked if I was interested in being considered. It was helpful to have someone who I knew and trusted at the organization speak so highly of the vision and people behind Boston Ballet—I couldn’t wait to join the team!

    Q: Do you have a favorite campaign/program you’ve run for Boston Ballet (or a previous company), and what were the results?

    A: I’ve been fortunate to work for organizations close to my heart and campaigns that make a difference in peoples’ lives so it is hard to choose a favorite. Most recently, we finished 44 performances of The Nutcracker, a New England treasure and tradition. We did a lot of advanced press and promotions including having the Nutcracker Bear zipline on the Rose Kennedy Greenway to promote tickets going on sale. The video generated great engagement on our social media channels, was covered by The Boston Globe, Patriot Ledger, NBC Boston, NECN, and Dance Magazine, and helped generate awareness and sales. Later, we did a social media campaign where the mice from The Nutcracker escaped the Boston Opera House and went sightseeing around Boston. It was wonderful to collaborate with other iconic Boston attractions like the Museum of Fine Arts and the Boston Tea Party Ships—and see people’s reactions to these mice walking down the streets of Boston.

    At Boston Ballet, I really enjoy that all of its programs have so many fascinating angles and stories to tell. I love to deep dive into the research, find creative ways to engage with audiences of all ages, and help people enrich their own understanding and experience of ballet, its history, and the people behind it.

    Q: It looks like you have worked with other non-profits and associations, how important is PR to their overall strategies?

    A: Whether a non-profit organization recognizes it or not, public relations is essential to their success. To  inspire generosity, mobilize people and make positive change, you must have public awareness, support and engagement. Fortunately, I think more and more organizations are recognizing this and making the necessary investments in bandwidth and budget to incorporate public relations as an intentional management function which will support strategic goals.

    Q: What advice do you have for others who are interested in a PR career in the arts?

    A: Artist, dancer and choreographer Martha Graham said, “Great dancers are not great because of their technique, they are great because of their passion.” The same is true for public relation professionals and that is so important to remember if you want a career in the arts. In addition to best practices and the fundamentals of public relations, bring your passion, creativity, and imagination to the work and you will have great success.

    Q: How has being a PRSA member impacted your career?

    A: There are many ways that being a PRSA member has enriched my career. Often times in a non-profit environment, you are part of a small team or might be the only public relations professional in the entire organization. Being a PRSA member expanded my network of brilliant brains to pick when I have a PR-related issue at work. It also helps me keep up-to-date on the latest trends and technologies in public relations and social media through on-demand webinars, in-person workshops, and articles which I am able to immediately apply to my work.

    I recently finished the APR accreditation process which allowed me to take a step back from the day to day of public relations and look at the broader systems, theories, and techniques behind the craft. As a life-long learner, I’m grateful that PRSA offers these unique and invaluable opportunities. I look forward to all that PRSA continues to offer and all I can offer PRSA in return.

    About Fast 5

    This is a feature of PRSA Boston’s Hot Topics blog page. The expert subject is someone who is clearly in demand, on the go, and nailing them down for a conversation is about as easy as … winning Powerball at $1.5 billion! But we know leaders like to share, so check back for insights, wisdom, author’s books about to hit the stands and other valuable tips. @prsaboston #prsabos

    Do YOU have a candidate for a FAST 5 interview? Email: Joshua Milne at josh@joshuamilnepr.com and pitch your subject expert!

    Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author or the individual being interviewed and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of PRSA Boston, PRSA National, staff or  board of directors of either organization.