PRXNE16

  • GE’s CCO DEIRDRE LATOUR TO KEYNOTE PRSA BOSTON’s ANNUAL MEETING

    First Speech in Boston Since GE Relocated

    GE's Deirdre LatourPRSA Boston chose the PRXNE16 Northeast District Conference to announce that GE’s Chief Communications Officer Deirdre Latour will be the keynote on Nov. 9, 2016 at the organization’s 66th Annual Meeting, themed ‘Communications for Innovation.’ The relocation of GE’s World Corporate Headquarters to Boston’s Seaport District is the year’s biggest business story for Massachusetts, with implications to public relations professionals from higher education, STEM and technology development, chamber and civic groups, infrastructure and commercial construction.

    “GE’s new leadership footprint is emblematic in how public relations advances the innovation economy, said PRSA Boston President Loring Barnes, APR. “To have the lead communications architect Deirdre Latour share how GE is collaborating with start-ups and stalwart brands will be both timely and insightful. This will be her first speech in Boston since GE relocated and we are thrilled.”

    Latour’s career journey from agency giant Edelman to GE underscores the range of professional opportunities that the corporate and agency duality allows. She is a member of the Arthur W. Page Society and has been recognized by PR Week and PR News.

    “GE is grateful for the enthusiastic reception we’ve received from the Massachusetts business community and legislative delegation,” said Latour, who will be returning to her home state. “As we move our headquarters, we understand how essential communications is to connecting with the Boston community.”

    GE’s decision to centralize its global headquarters in the burgeoning Seaport District has turbocharged Boston’s-related building, public works and highway construction. Latour will speak about how ‘adaptive communications’ is essential for innovation industries to accelerate business plans.

    About GE (www.ge.com. @ge)

    GE (NYSE:GE) is the world’s Digital Industrial Company, transforming industry with software-defined machines and solutions that are connected, responsive and predictive. GE is organized around a global exchange of knowledge, the “GE Store,” through which each business shares and accesses the same technology, markets, structure and intellect. Each invention further fuels innovation and application across our industrial sectors. With people, services, technology and scale, GE delivers better outcomes for customers by speaking the language of industry.

    About Deirdre Latour, CCO GE (@deirdrelatour)

    Latour leads the company’s global communications functions, shaping the company’s culture and supports its business growth worldwide. She has worked for GE for over twelve years, having made the shift from respected PR firm Edelman. She is an alumna of College of the Holy Cross and member of the Arthur W. Page Society, a community of senior and chief communications officers, PR agency CEOs and academics.

    About PRSA Boston (http://www.prsaboston.org, @prsaboston #prsabos)

    The 66-year Boston Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (registered 501c6) connects members to the world’s largest association for public relations professionals. PRSA Boston offers year-round thought leadership, Accreditation certification (APR), educational content and networking programs, which this year included hosting the PRXNE16 Northeast District Conference. PRSA Boston will host the PRSA 2017 International Conference in October 2017.

  • Guinness World Records logo

    FAST 5: Five Things to Know About Guinness World Records and Why They Teamed Up With PRSA

    In Campaign, PRXNE16, Sponsorship on

    Keith Green, APR (@KeithsTweets) is relatively new to his job as VP of Marketing & Commercial Sales at Guinness World Records (@GWR) but that hasn’t stopped him from directing the company’s efforts to jump in feet-first and become involved with PRSA.

    Keith Green PhotoHis background in entertainment and events seems to be a perfect match working for one of the world’s most fun and recognizable brands. He spent six years in the NBA for the Philadelphia 76ers, nine years in the NASCAR field as the Director of Public Relations for two different racetracks and eight years for Synergy, an award-winning events agency in New Jersey. Keith’s experience also includes several adjunct faculty positions, where he’s shared his sports marketing and PR experience with undergraduate and graduate students.

    We caught up with Keith in advance of PRXNE16, PRSA Northeast District Conference, where Guinness World Records will the Platinum Sponsor.

    Q: Your involvement with PRSA has spanned quite a few years. Tell us about your experience with the organization.

    I’m a big believer in PRSA.  Membership is a great way to interact with like-minded people and learn from the best in the PR business. My career has advanced and my network has grown because of the local chapter events and the international conferences I’ve attended over the years. While it’s like most anything else- you get what you give- (Keith served on the PRSA-NY board for three years and received his APR certification four years ago) PRSA is a terrific organization and I’m bullish on its growth.

    Q: Most everyone knows Guinness World Records through the book. What can you share about your role?

    A: For our U.S. office (headquarters are in London, with offices in Japan, China and Dubai) I oversee our book marketing initiatives, as well as our commercial sales efforts. Our book, which is still a best-seller, launches every September (although it will be August 30 this year), and our marketing efforts are geared toward the readers (the kids) and those who buy it for them or influence them-teachers, moms and grandmothers. Although the 2017 book will be our 61st edition, the commercial side of our business is relatively new. Companies of all types work with us to have a judge oversee a record attempt and use our logo to pre-promote the attempt, post-event if the attempt is successful, as well as in promotional videos. Although our business is more than six decades old, we continue to evolve, which is extremely exciting.

    Q: You started at Guinness World Records about seven months ago. Why do you think it’s a good fit to be involved with PRSA and why are you doing it so quickly?

    A:   Relationships are important to me. I know the organization and people well, so that’s critical. Because of those factors, I know that when we attend and activate at a conference that we will have the opportunity to show our creativity and add value for the attendees.  Working with PRSA also gives us the opportunity to connect with our various target audiences-those PR and marketing pros who work at agencies, brands, non-profits and educational institutions. That’s the beauty of record breaking- it works for just about any kind of business.

    Q: How do your marketing and PR teams work together?

    A: Nearly every day, a cool record is being broken somewhere across the globe. Since our PR team oversees our digital efforts, it’s critical that we communicate about what’s happening and how we can leverage some of those record attempts in a timely fashion from a marketing perspective. A great, recent example is Dude Perfect, which broke a series of amazing basketball records last month. The content and resulting video were amazing, and it helps us tell a story to an audience we might not reach as easily.

    We also work together on two major events throughout the year- our Book Launch event in the late summer (August 30 this year) and Guinness World Records Day-where we encourage people all over the world to break records- on November 10.

    Q: You’ve taught marketing and PR at a few universities. What would you tell someone graduating from college or a recent grad about breaking into the PR field?

    A: I always tell my students, “If you can write well, you are ahead of 90% of the people in the workforce.”  It doesn’t matter if you are writing an email to a client, a speech for the president of your company, a blog post or a concise Tweet, writing is still a fundamental skill that many people lack. I believe social media and texting have further eroded that skill for many of us, not just the younger generations.

    About Fast 5

    This is a feature of PRSA Boston’s Hot Topics blog page. The expert subject is someone who is clearly in demand, on the go, and nailing them down for a conversation is on the fly! But we know leaders like to share, so check back for insights, wisdom, author’s books about to hit the stands and other valuable tips. @prsaboston #prsabos

    Do YOU have a candidate for a FAST 5 interview? Email: Joshua Milne at josh@joshuamilnepr.com and pitch your subject expert!

    Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author or the individual being interviewed and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of PRSA Boston, PRSA National, staff or  board of directors of either organization. 

  • Visit Syracuse Nikita Jankowski - Syracuse. Do Your Thing 2

    Fast 5: Q&A with Visit Syracuse Communications Manager Nikita Jankowski on new destination brand, Syracuse. Do Your Thing

    In Campaign, PRXNE16 on

    Visit Syracuse (formerly known as the Syracuse Convention & Visitors Bureau) launched, Syracuse. Do Your Thing, a new destination brand for the Greater Syracuse Area in 2015. It was the first time the destination was given an official brand. The accredited tourism organization also unveiled a new logo, new name, new video, new song and a wonderful new outlook on regional tourism promotion.

    “This is a game changer,” said Visit Syracuse Communication Manager Nikita Jankowski. “Our role is to attract more business to the area and economic growth through tourism. This brand will take us to the next level and build on our initiatives.”

    In Syracuse, it’s all about the freedom to be you and do what you love. Be quirky, be fun, be fantastic, feel right at home – whether it’s being stopped at the country’s only upside down stoplight (thanks to the Irish); climbing the world’s largest indoor suspended ropes course (inside of Destiny USA, New York’s largest shopping, dining and entertainment center); getting down to a live band and finger-licking good BBQ (at the original Dinosaur Bar-B-Que); walking in the footsteps of hundreds of brave citizens that helped slaves escape to freedom – while fighting for women’s rights; scouting for Bald Eagles at Onondaga Lake Park or Peregrine Falcons downtown, experiencing the downtown urban renaissance or even uncovering the many Syracuse inventions that helped to shape America, Syracuse provides the platform for a refreshing and inviting adventure.

    We sat down to ask five questions to Visit Syracuse Communication Manager Nikita Jankowski to learn more about the new branding campaign.

    1. Why did you brand the Greater Syracuse Area?

    Destination branding gives a sense of place. It is the face of the region and helps strengthen the bond between the visitors and the destination. For example, tourists know that when they go to Las Vegas – what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas or when they visit New York State, they will usually end up saying I Love New York. We wanted to enhance that experience for Syracuse visitors. To do that, we had to reveal our strengths as a destination and were able to do so in those three words – Do Your Thing.

    1. What does Do Your Thing mean?

    The message is about our area’s ability to take a traveler’s reason(s) for arriving here and customize it. We make their experience personal and emotional in such a powerful way that they leave with memories and a sense of connection to the area. We allow them to celebrate their passion, pursuit, hobby or relationships and while they are doing so, we celebrate it alongside them. Our brand promise sums it up nicely:

    It’s time to rally your passion. Find life’s shining moments and celebrate them in a place where true colors never fade; a place where independent spirits and an energetic community come together in perfect harmony. Here is where you find your center. Reconnect the dots with the things that truly matter and make memories on historic streets. Do what makes you happy. Syracuse. Do Your Thing.

    Visit Syracuse realizes it’s not just about the region; it’s also about the people and the stories they create, the passion they bring and the freedom they long for to be themselves. Do Your Thing is a bold, open-ended, action-based challenge to the over-used, under-effective tourism slogan, Something for Everyone.

    1. What obstacles did you face when creating the brand?

    Visit Syracuse toiled over implementing the perfect brand for the region, a task seemingly made more difficult by the diversity of the destination. This diversity and its personalized appeal to our customers are in fact, our primary brand building blocks. The agency we hired to help brand Syracuse, BCF, eloquently captured it in three simple words, “Do Your Thing.”

    1. How did you come up with Do Your Thing?

    There was quite a lot of research that went into our brand. Our customers told us what they wanted and now, our answer to them is Syracuse. Do Your Thing. The fact that Do Your Thing derived not from us, our partners or our stakeholders, but rather our customers, enables those words to speak with authority and power. Our job from here on is to personalize these words to create appeal, interest and intrigue with each individual customer we touch.

    These words bleed Syracuse. Historically, Syracusans have always been free-spirited, passionate and done their thing their way. We just gave it a fitting tagline.

    1. Is the brand catching on?

    Absolutely! This is not a destination message that promises “something for everyone”. This is not about selling and promoting things to see and do. It is all about communicating the freedom, empowerment and emotional connection created by the Syracuse regional experience.

    We travel all around the world and the feedback has been phenomenal! This message of customization, exploration and freedom resonates across all of our market segments and types of visitors. It also creates traction with our residents and businesses. It manages to connect with our past heritage as a center for social progress while also engaging our future by encouraging individuality and uniqueness. That’s why we now own the trademark for Do Your Thing.

    About Nikita Jankowski

    Nikita Jankowski leads Visit Syracuse’s public relations and communications initiatives. Nikita’s role includes hosting and generating content for travel trade professionals and media representatives to encourage travel to the Greater Syracuse area; contributing to $863,000,000 of annual direct visitor spending. Nikita started her professional career as a television news reporter for ABC, FOX and CBS affiliates throughout New York State and Maine. Nikita graduated from the historic Tuskegee University, with a Bachelor of Arts degree (Concentration: English/Communications). She serves on the Board of Directors for the Public Relations Society of America of Central New York (PRSA-CNY), a member of PRSA’s Travel & Tourism section and is on the Advisory Committee of Social Media Breakfast (SMB) Syracuse; a national initiative for teaching, sharing and learning about industry best practices.

    About Fast 5

    This is a feature of PRSA Boston’s Hot Topics blog page. The expert subject is someone who is clearly in demand, on the go, and nailing them down for a conversation is about as easy as … winning Powerball at $1.5 billion! But we know leaders like to share, so check back for insights, wisdom, author’s books about to hit the stands and other valuable tips. @prsaboston #prsabos

    Do YOU have a candidate for a FAST 5 interview? Email: Joshua Milne at josh@joshuamilnepr.com and pitch your subject expert!

    Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author or the individual being interviewed and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of PRSA Boston, PRSA National, staff or  board of directors of either organization. 

  • Karen Yankovich

    Get Amazing Returns in 5 Easy Steps With PR and Social Media!

    More and more, I realize how Social Media and PR can work together to support your overall business. If you do it right, of course!

    Time is money, and social media is a big beast … I know. So, here are some tips for how you can leverage PR with your social media campaigns to get the most bang for your buck.

    How to Rocket Your Marketing Efforts Into High Gear

    1. Start by doing research on Twitter, industry-related websites (and more specifically, their blog post topics), and LinkedIn updates.

    Find out:

    • Who is writing about what you are an expert in
    • Which reporters (online, TV, magazine) report on your niche
    • Who is talking about what you want to talk about
    1. Connect with these people on Twitter. Create a Twitter list called “Media,” make it private, and add these names to the list. This will help you organize your connections, and allow you to keep tabs on their updates (which can give you plenty of ideas).

    But first, make sure:

    • Your Twitter profile is professional
    • Your Twitter description is interesting and has strong keywords
    • You engage with a call to action somewhere in your profile
    1. Connect with this same list on LinkedIn. In your connection request, be sure to mention, “I just read your article/saw your segment, I loved it, and would love to connect with you here on LinkedIn.” Stay personal, authentic, and real. Similarly to your Twitter list, you can tag connections on LinkedIn as “Media” to keep them organized. LinkedIn

    Check to see if:

    • Your LinkedIn profile is rock solid, polished, and professional
    • Your summary and experience really speak to what you want to do and who you want to connect with
    • Your profile picture is up to date
    • You’ve posted a few updates recently that show up in your “Posts” section

    Now that you’ve built your foundation, it’s time to make sure they know you exist!

    1. Schedule a few times per week to dip into that Twitter list you created. Research who has tweeted what and see if there are tweets that are relevant to your expertise and niche.

    With these tweets, it’s always great to:

    • Favorite them — it never hurts to give your contacts a good old ego boost
    • Retweet them — if you think something is interesting, share it
    • Reply to them — engagement can really grow your following on social media
    1. Do the same on LinkedIn. Schedule a few times per week to research your connections. Sort them by the “Media” tag you created, and then go through that list of connections.

    You are looking to:

    • See what they’ve shared recently
    • Comment on posts that are relevant to you
    • Like and share those posts through other networks

    Why You Should Do This Sooner Rather Than Later

    Do these five steps NOW to set the stage for reaching out to contacts as resources, prospects, or collaborators later on.

    Make sure your name is recognizable to them as someone who adds value, is an expert, and is generous with sharing their content. This is where you begin to build the relationship — long before you ever contact them directly. It’s always better to make connections before you need to tap into them. That way, when you have an idea, a pitch, or a prospect, you’re approaching them as a warm contact.

    No more cold emails, cold connections, or cold calls. This means the possibility of a successful outcome skyrockets. Your target contact is much more likely to respond favorably to your request.

    These media contacts can be of huge value to you, because one nicely placed media shout-out can bring you tons of new business!

    The best part? These five steps are all free and very easy to implement. It doesn’t take a huge chunk of time either, if you spread them out over a week or two. And when you put in the maintenance of a few minutes a day, a few times a week, you will be seeing the return very quickly.

    Have questions on how best to get started, keep going, or who to target? Join me in my LinkedIn Group and I’ll be happy to answer ask any questions you may have!

    About Karen Yankovich

    Karen will be presenting at PRXNE16 on June 13. Her official title is “Digital Strategist”. Karen has built her multiple 6-figure business, Uplevel Media, by learning how to blend high-touch relationship based marketing with practical online business savvy, and she brings that success to her clients as well. Her mission is to empower entrepreneurs to create great relationships so that clients and customers flow because of your expertise and influence; allowing her clients to build highly profitable businesses doing what you love, all while making an impact.

  • Who Ignited Cause Communications? Carol Cone, That’s Who. And She’s @ PRXNE16!

    PRXNE Keynote Speaker Carol Cone does more than CSR. She holds an impressive record of show jumping accomplishments.

    If your PR efforts include getting any organization to think beyond its boundaries by bettering society, odds are you applying the tools and cause marketing ideology that were pioneered by trailblazer and serial entrepreneur, Carol Cone. Long before terms like CSR, cause branding, corporate citizenship, sustainability or social purpose were adopted as business vocabulary, Carol created and claimed a new position within the C-suites of Fortune 500 companies, awakening them to the compelling business outcomes of engaging with society to leverage their reach and resources to do something purposeful with their influence. Where that vision has taken her, and savvy business leaders and marketers of all stripes, will be the subject of her PRXNE16 keynote on Monday, June 13th when Carol Cone comes back to where it all began, Boston.

    Loring Barnes, APR, PRSA Boston Chapter President and an early alumna of Cone, Inc., caught up with her former boss on topics ranging from authenticity to what it means to be competitive for this special expanded installment of Fast 5+5.

    Carol ConeSo Carol, you’re coming home to Boston. What are your thoughts on how Boston looks today?

    CC: When I founded Cone in 1980, Route 128 was known as “America’s Technology Highway”, with Boston home to important corporate brands –­ John Hancock, Gillette, Sheraton, Polaroid, BankBoston, Digital Equipment and Reebok – that gave this region a unique center of innovation, power and corporate leadership. Today, there is a differing type of innovation largely centered in healthcare, bio and medtech, underpinned by the regions expansive educational foundation of our universities.

    Q: You’ve been called ‘the mother of cause marketing.’ Is that a big mantel to carry?

    CC: To the extent this associates me with authentically linking the power of companies and brands with social issues, I’ve come to accept this as a succinct explanation of a complex and very exciting new business strategy. If every CEO or Executive Director understood how to harness social transparency and the interconnectedness of people and social purpose, their corporations and NGOs wouldn’t need an expert to bring big ideas and diverse partners to make this happen. It’s fulfilling professional vocation that has been exciting to nurture over time. Actually, it is my personal purpose that I was fortunate to discover very early in my career.

    Q: Are Millennials the torchbearers for advancing purposeful corporate social engagement?

    CC: Their generational imprint is an asset to a company or nonprofit that is looking to grow its visibility and impact. Millennials are teaching organizations that committed employees want to bring their ‘whole’ selves to work, contributing to missions that are compatible with their personal values and sense of purpose. They don’t want to bifurcate their convictions, rather they view their jobs as another channel through which they can achieve meaningful social impact. The challenge is for the employer to understand how to leverage that compassion as it inspires younger stewards of change to support the goals of their employers at the same time.

    Q: What is your worst PR or marketing experience and what did you learn from it?  

    CC: The phone call from my office started this way: “At least no one died!”  It was Thanksgiving weekend and that opening certainly got my attention. We were conducting a promotional tour for Smirnoff Vodka providing a real-time concert via a highly accomplished pianist, formally dressed in tails, sitting on an elegantly decorated flatbed truck, touring the city. Key to the decor was a 15’ high Smirnoff bottle illuminated with tiny glowing lights. What we didn’t know was that the display’s creator did not use inflammable plastic. The giant bottle, after an hour or so, burst into flames causing the pianist to leap off the flatbed. Thankfully no one was hurt, but the news coverage was not exactly what we planned. Lesson learned:  make sure you have lots of insurance coverage and plan, plan, plan for all eventualities.

    Q: OK, so what was your best experience and how did that inform your work going forward?

    CC: The creation of the Rockport Fitness Walking movement, that brought fitness walking to America as the next means of credible and accessible exercise. It also elevated Rockport to become a beloved national brand, growing them from an unknown $20 million company to over $150 million in 5 years. The second has been inspiring PNC Financial to embrace early childhood education as their core social purpose, committing $350 million over 20 years helping children to be socially, emotionally and intellectually ready for Kindergarten. We coaxed PNC to partner with the National Head Start Association (obvious) and Sesame Street (not so obvious). They have reached millions of children and families and have helped launch a national movement for early childhood education. Lesson learned for both: do your homework; find the next emerging social purpose and link amazing partners with a long-term commitment.

    Q: How would you describe yourself in one word?

    CC: Passionate!

    Q: You’re at a point where you can write books and relax. What is it that you still want to accomplish with Carol Cone ON PURPOSE, your next entrepreneurial venture?

    CC: When we’ve cured every social malady or inequity, I guess we can fold up our tent, but one only need to look at crushing world health and education needs, environmental abuses, and social stigmas to see the demand for change in our world society. Big ideas need expert accelerators to bring them to life, and that’s where our Purpose Collaborative steps in. I am so excited that in less than a year, we have grown to 32 members, representing more than 300 experts in purpose, from culture enhancement to comprehensive program development and execution to virtual reality for social impact. I am humbled by the community we have created, the smarts and passions of my “partners” and the challenges we are addressing.

    We find that while executives want to do more, they often concede that bandwidth limits how their organizations externalize ethics and trust. This is the new way of doing business, and its only growing. As long as there exists a need to upscale bold ideas with organizations that are willing to anchor them at the center of organizational and brand strategy our work is not done. Companies that get it – like Unilever, Microsoft, CVS, PNC and Starbucks ­– show the upside of adopting societal engagement at their core and learn that integration of their core competencies with society provides magical impacts well beyond their initial plan.

    Q: The reality of virtual communication reshapes how employees and customers learn and interact. What are your thoughts on the best of technology vs. in-person learning?

    CC: Technology allows almost unlimited access to information, from short form to long, from print to videos. The challenge is not getting overwhelmed, yet staying curious and looking for obvious — for learning — and not so obvious, such as connections for ideation. In-person learning has a wonderful aspect too, especially if teams come together with a shared purpose to solve a challenge and some ground rules as to how they interact. I really like both.

    Q: I will never forget our first phone interview: were keenly interested in how I defined being ‘competitive’ outside of the office. I later learned that you had arguably a dual career as a competitive equestrian. It’s hard to term your impressive record of show jumping accomplishment a ‘hobby,’ but how does this competitiveness indicator predict the profile of someone who will excel as a cause communications specialist?

    CC: The DNA of any innovator requires habits that hone knowledge and grow your confidence outside of business hours. Competitive horse jumping, as one example, takes inordinate discipline, off-hours commitment for work and travel, and a selfless willingness to roll up one’s sleeves for the most unceremonious tasks, such as cleaning horse stalls. The performance aspect emerges as minutes from years of training, learning and being coached. There are personality parallels of a competitive person that informs the focus of anyone who sees their PR career as one of transforming our world. Carol Cone ON PURPOSE is being built with collaborators who live this truth of social activism: you have to make it happen, with resilience, persistence, and active collaboration. Being competitive – meaning never giving up and learning, learning, learning and giving of oneself is a perceptible core belief system that is evident in how someone spends their personal time and influence others to do good works.

    Q: When you finish your presentation at PRXNE16, how do you anticipate the audience will think and feel about who they are, what they do and how they do it?

    CC: I hope they will be inspired, and have an elevated understanding of the role of social purpose in business today and how they can bring their values, passion and smarts into this new way of working for personal, business and societal impact. Doing well and doing good can be profound! You just need to be authentic, do your homework, not give up and look for the ‘gems’ to ignite for amazing outcomes.

    Carol offers this list of inspiring and must reads for CSR best practices: Download CCOP Cause Resource List  HERE.

    About Carol Cone, Founder + CEO, Carol Cone ON PURPOSE
    Twitter: @carolcone Web: http://www.purposecollaborative.com

    Carol Cone is CEO of Carol Cone ON PURPOSE (CCOP), a 21st-century consultancy whose mission is to move social purpose to the center of business and brand strategy. At the core of CCOP is The Purpose Collaborative, a collective of over 30 agencies, boutiques and individuals, with deep purpose, CSR and sustainability capabilities from strategy to execution.

    For over 25 years, Carol has embraced a commitment to building lasting partnerships between companies, brands and social issues for deep business and societal impact. Her groundbreaking work includes Avon Breast Cancer Crusade, Reebok Human Rights Awards, American Heart Go Red for Women, American Lung Association Lung Force, PNC Grow Up Great, Microsoft YouthSpark and The Vaseline Healing Project.

    She is also a recognized thought leader in social purpose, having conducted the world’s first research, then dozens of studies with business executives, citizens, employees and nonprofits to gain critical insights to inspire organizations to engage with society as being a wise business strategy.  She is a sought-after speaker and media expert, sharing her insights on purpose branding, corporate citizenship, sustainability and CSR.

    Carol served as the founder, CEO and Chairman of Cone, Inc. from 1980-2010. In 2007, PR Week called her “arguably the most powerful and visible figure in the world of Cause Branding.”

    In 2009, she was one of two US judges for the first PR Lions Awards at the Cannes Festival of Creativity. Her first book, Breakthrough Nonprofit Branding was published in 2010. Overall, Cone’s signature cause programs have raised more than $2 billion for various social issues. www.purposecollaborative.com

    About Loring Barnes, APR, Chief Communications Officer, Clarity
    President, PRSA Boston + PRXNE16 Conference Co-Chair
    Twitter: @claritynews + @loringbarnes  Web:  www.claritygroup.com

    Anyone who caught World Cup fever in ’94 or rode transit to Boston’s first Tall Ships knows Loring’s capacity for creating and executing big ideas, in part by uniting new partners, a core premise of cause communications. These programs earned nods by the USOOC and changed the culture of a behemoth government bureaucracy, the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA).

    Cone, Inc. was among Loring’s earliest and most influential agency posts that included the eventual Omnicom sibling agency Copithorne + Bellows among others in TX and PA. She founded Clarity in 2001 as a reputation and brand-building consultancy in order to be closer to the action as a C-client advisor. Clarity’s transformation of the CDC’s National HIV Testing Day campaign to become the Federal agency’s most impactful and praised at the United Nations by the White House stands out on a career highlight reel that includes: professionally recognized launches, mature brand reinvigorations, partnerships and effective crisis counsel alongside law enforcement agencies of all jurisdictions. The UMass Amherst ‘Alumna to Watch’ is passionate about dog rescue among a variety of board and volunteer commitments she keeps in play.

    PRXNE16 Speakers, Directions + Registration: HERE  Hosted by: @prsaboston with @prsane

    Follow PRXNE16 News: #PRXNE